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Category: Vegetables

Nani’s Vitamin Soup

Nani’s Vitamin Soup

Fall has begun in New York and soup season is here! I love soup. It can be comforting, delicious and nutritious. And like many other popular dishes that exist in multiple cultures, soup has several origin stories. Among the most popular is the suggestion the word “soup” can be traced back to the sixth-century Latin word “suppa,” meaning a piece of bread eaten in broth. We’ll go with that.

There are endless creative ingredient combinations for a delicious soup. Here I share with you a recipe I made for my family last week when we all came down with a pesky cold. I call it Vitamin Soup! It’s rich tapestry of vegetables, herbs and spices is guaranteed to boost the immune system while providing a delicious and satisfying meal.

I strongly believe this is how we should take our vitamins. In my opinion, the health and wellness section of the supermarket is the produce section. The name vitamin soup is a fun play on words and it doesn’t just need to be limited to when we’re sick. A balanced and vegetable-rich diet complimented with healthy fats, savory spices and fresh herbs not only does a body good- but it is the best way to enjoy the fruit of the earth and maintain a healthy body, mind and spirit.

This is also a good way to use leftovers in the fridge. For example, I had a bit of rice and quinoa leftover that I just threw in there.

Customize with your favorite veggies + herbs and enjoy!

 

Roasted Cauliflower with Tangy Tahini Sauce

Roasted Cauliflower with Tangy Tahini Sauce

Cauliflower is a wonderful ingredient to cook with. This cruciferous vegetable has a mildly earthy and nutty flavor. It’s easy to cook, a nice source of vitamin C and quiet filling as vegetables go.

I try to incorporate vegetables in most meals, but once a week I like to highlight them in my Meatless Mondays. It is a simple way to not only diversify the week’s meals, but also experiment with whatever seasonal vegetables tickle your fancy at the moment.

The are many ways to cook with cauliflower. Simply roasting with olive oil, salt + pepper will result in a nice gold brown texture which enhances the nutty flavors. Combined with the sweetness from the caramelized onions and the tangy tahini sauce- you have yourself a flavor explosion made from a few simple ingredients.

 

Check out this page  for the Tangy Tahini Sauce Recipe.

Panko-Crusted Dijon Cod & Fragrant Mediterranean Salad

Panko-Crusted Dijon Cod & Fragrant Mediterranean Salad

Over the years I’ve enjoyed many delightful meals with my friend, Anjali. We both like beautiful and healthy food but never compromise flavor! So we teamed up for our next video to cook a delicious menu of panko crusted Dijon Cod fish and a fragrant Mediterranean salad with fresh herbs.

The fish is light and flaky with a tang of Dijon and cooks in a snap. The cucumber-tomato-feta salad is savory, fragrant and colorful.  Pair that with a chilled  Rose and fantastic company and you got yourself a fabulous meal!

 

Make The Best Steak Of Your Life!

Make The Best Steak Of Your Life!

Hi Friends,

I’m excited to introduce the first video of our Basil and Roses YouTube Channel!

I team up with my cousin Kam to make the best steak of your life. Impressive doesn’t have to mean fancy. All you need is great ingredients and technique, fabulous company and wine doesn’t hurt either.

The recipe is below. Check us out and feel free to comment, share, try the recipe and give us feedback.
Happy cooking!

 

 

 

The Fire Of Our Lives

The Fire Of Our Lives

There is something uniquely special about the appeal of fire, we love being around the warmth and glow it creates. There is something that draws us towards the bonfire and the hearth. I believe our memories- conscious or subconscious, personal or collective are a part of that draw. Most of us have treasured memories of people who have cooked for us- Mothers, Fathers, Grandparents, friends… We cherish these memories because they are a special reminder of the love and generosity we’ve received in our lifetime. We gather around the fire, and the hearth and our tables to pay homage to that gift. To quote Michael Pollan, “a good pot holds memories.

Tahran, Iran circa 1970

 

Most cultures have some form of grilling tradition which usually results in groups of people in the family or community gathering around a fire and sharing a meal together. Kebabs in the Middle East, Asado in Argentina, Tandoor in India, Churrasco in Brazil, Luau in Hawaii, Sausage Sizzle in Australia,  Gogigui in Korea, Hibachi in Japan, Chuanr and Char Siu in China, Sataay in Southeast Asia, Lechon in the Philippines, Braii in South Africa (for which there is a national day and anthem, which I learned about from Bon Appetite). And of course there is the classic American Backyard BBQ which many of us enjoyed this past Memorial Day Weekend.

 

Each of these traditions have their own unique style and flavor, but the common denominator is the communal aspect of the tradition. The lyrics in South Africa’s Braii anthem go “We stand united at the bonfire. We raise our glasses to the clear, blue sky, tell me your story and I’ll tell you mine.” Gathering around the grill is universal. When we don’t have an actual fire, we gather in our kitchens. Near the hearth, near the source of the fire, around those whom provide for us sustenance and satisfaction. One of my personal highlights of the year is that moment when I bring the turkey out of the oven on Thanksgiving day. Surrounded by friends and family who applaud and cheer as if I just invented bread! I love that moment and appreciate their gratitude. Everyone wants to take a picture with me and the turkey- which incidentally works out nicely, it gives our bird the right amount of time to rest.

As an avid cook, I may be biased on the importance of cooking and how it elevates our experience. Beyond my personal passion, there is an important evolutionary aspect of cooking that may be represented in the fires we gather around.

Cooking is what separates us from our evolutionary cousins, what made us civilized creatures. Learning to cook elevated humans from lone animal to more intelligent beings. Some neurologist believe the reason humans have bigger brains than gorillas is because we learned to cook. By using fire to cook our food, we spent less time foraging and less time chewing our food. This allowed us to get more energy out of our food, allowing our brains to grow. Although the human brain is 2% of our body mass, approximately 20% of what we consume fuels brain activity. The more calories we consumed, the more our brains grew.  With more time spent around the fire, we spend more time together and learned from one another.  This topic is artfully covered by the fantastic Michael Pollan in his book Cookednow a stunning docu-series on Netflix. A visually captivating, poignant and educational series.

“The discovery of fire and its use with cooking completely change our evolutionary curve, enabling us to shrink our guts and grow our brains…The cook fire tamed us and socialized us by giving us the institution of the meal.” -Michael Pollan

This history of us is fascinating. Cooking plays a role in how we came to be creatures which have the capacity to enjoy life. A transformation occurred when we stopped cooking for survival, and started cooking for pleasure. So raise a glass to friends and loved ones who cook for you and who’s kitchens you’ve gathered around. Not only are they the source of many of our best experiences, it may also be that without them we would be a lot less intelligent!

I love to grill and summer BBQ’s are a wonderful way to gather around the fire for “old times” sake.

This week I’ll share my favorite grilling recipes with you. From the now (somewhat) famous
“Naz Burger”, to fun marinades for grilled chicken and fresh summer veggie recipes.

Happy Summer, my fellow humans!

Roasted Veggie Quinoa Medley

Roasted Veggie Quinoa Medley

I love quinoa and use it often in my recipes. I like the health benefits of this gluten-free, high fiber content, magnesium and iron rich seed which also happens to be one of the most protein rich foods we can eat.  The Incas discovered the seed around 4 thousand years ago, which they believed increased the stamina of their warriors. In the last decade, Quinoa has grown in popularity and is considered a “super food!” Quinoa is not a grain. It’s actually a seed that is related to the spinach and beet families. And although I don’t believe it’s a cardinal sin to eat carbs (as seen in my reviews of these restaurants), I do enjoy the rice like feel of quinoa without the heavy feeling of carbohydrate-rich foods.

Quinoa is a great item to have in the pantry- it can be used as a side on its own or, mixed with veggies and proteins. Here is a personal favorite of mine, mixed with a kind of deconstructed ratatouille... enjoy!

 

Black Bean Bowl

Black Bean Bowl

Make this for a quick and satisfying lunch or dinner when you don’t have a lot of time.

It’s high in protein and flavor and quiet satisfying for a low calorie meal. The kick from the jalapeno gives this recipe a nice heat without being overpowering.

It can also be used as a dip with tortilla chips when entertaining, so it’s versatile.

 

 

 

Rosemary & Sea-Salt Baked Potato Chips

Rosemary & Sea-Salt Baked Potato Chips

These baked potato “chips” are great as a snack on their own dipped in ketchup, or work well as a side dish to any weeknight dinner. They’re super easy to make too!

 

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Healthy Eggplant & Egg Pita Sandwich (Sabich!)

Healthy Eggplant & Egg Pita Sandwich (Sabich!)

There are many delicious vegetarian sandwiches which originate from the Middle East and Sabich is one of my favorites! Possibly even second to Falafel which is so wonderful.

Sabich is inspired by Iraqi/Israeli street food and is dense with flavor. The chopped salad and pickles in brine offer a nice textural contrast to the softer eggplant and hard boiled egg. The hummus ties it all together.

Similar dishes like this exist in other Mediterranean cultures. In the Persian home I grew up in, Saturday morning breakfasts often included an eggplant and egg dish. Recipe testing for this post reminded me of simple family moments on casual weekend mornings. I remember my Father used to put red and white onion peels in the water when boiling the eggs which beautifully colored the eggs with gentle watercolor-like shades of amber, red and brown. This “colorful” memory made me smile. How simple things like discarded onion skin can increase the value and beauty of our experiences.

Try this for a weekend brunch or a meatless Mondays and you will not be disappointed!

Traditionally, the eggplant is fired, I saute or roast for a healthier alternative.

 

 

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Tuscan Grilled Veggie Sandwich

Tuscan Grilled Veggie Sandwich

I created this delicious sandwich for a celebration gathering for my sister’s birthday inspired by her favorite flavors and it was a hit! It’s colorful, flavorful and the presentation had a “wow” factor for guests… or maybe it was just the melty gooye cheese oozing out the sides of the sumptuous panino that had everyone excited… ?

The natural ingredients layer together nicely and create a depth of flavor that is nearly orgasmic (direct quote from of the guests!). It’s really easy to make too:

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